Wednesday, April 1, 2015

A = Alarums and Excursions

If you have not had your head in the sand during the past two months, you will know that this is the eve of the A to Z blog fest, held annually during the month of April. Hundreds (literally) of bloggers all participate in the alphabet-themed blog, posting weekdays and Saturdays in alphabetical order. One poster I really enjoyed was a master crocheter. Her contribution was a blog of crocheted flower patterns from a to z. The flowers were delightful, beautiful, charming. Another had a collection of legendary creatures, from basilisks to … well, I forget what Z was. It is great fun and exhausting if, like me, you don’t have the sense to sit down a couple months ahead of time and plan things out. 

I signed up but ultimately bowed out, since I have a major project that I am working on and simply can’t commit to the level of activity that comes with this wonderful hop.

I can post, as much as I can, with the letter of the day, and send folks over to the A to Z site to check the list of bloggers and their themes. It’s fun, informative, enjoyable, delicious. Do check them out, read, comment, maybe start following. There is lots to see and enjoy.
 

Click here to Go to the A to Z Challenge


A =Alarums and Excursions
I remember reading Shakespeare in college (a dangerous activity, actually, since prolongued reading will have you thinking in Iambic Pentameter) and running across that term.  I knew what it meant from the context: martial goings-on, lords coming and going and a lot of literal sabre-rattling. 
Alarums and Excursions, by golly!
We don’t all live in Elizabethan times, but I’m sure we’ve all experienced the sort of clamor and hoo-haw that I, at least, would give that name to.  Having lived on a military base for a stretch of times, I saw a lot of it.

Another meaning is clamor, excitement and feverish or disordered activity.  Rather like the Black Friday sales at Wal-Mart in the US. 
The older version was more fun.

DEFINITION:
1:martial sounds and the movement of soldiers across the stage —used as a stage direction in Elizabethan drama

2: clamor, excitement, and feverish or disordered activity

Example:  <I'm not sure I'm up to the alarums and excursions that'll come with Sally's wedding>

Alarums and excursions was first used in 1605









 


15 comments:

  1. Hi Diana - fun A post ... I hadn't realised the connection - but then I've never lived on a military base ... cheers to Shakespeare (sometimes!) .. Hilary

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  2. Hi, Hilary - definitely cheers to Shakespeare! Except Titus Andronicus. I refuse to believe he wrote it!

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  3. Odd words aren't they? Would be funny to hear them at a black Friday event..LOL.

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  4. Hi, Sharon - Hmmm... Wal-Mart people in Shakespearean garb would be worth seeing!

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  5. Hey, what do you mean "we don't all live in Elizabethan times?" My husband would tell you that most of the time...I do (it's my favorite period in history and I'm a history nut).

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    1. I'm not sure what period I live in, since I like a number of them, but whichever one it is, I guarantee there are more kings, queens and nobles than peons based on everyone I know who says that they have lived before.

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  6. Hi Diana! Thanks for visiting me today. :D Yes, Shakespeare will mess up your whole thought rhythm after a while. lol

    One of my favorite examples of alarums & excursions: the soldiers arriving during "Smooth Criminal" in Michael Jackson's Moonwalker.

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    1. Hi, Debra -
      I'd forgotten those soldiers. Definitely alarums and excursions!

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  7. I'm holding my granddaughter as i write this. thank you for the mention of my flowers. Good luck to all a - zers. don't feel bad about bowing out, Diana. I didn't even sign up.

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    1. M. J. Joachim - If you put out a book of patterns (I should check...) I'm good for a copy...

      (And holding a granddaughter trumps just about any smile-maker I can think of)

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  8. Ah, Shakespearean language- you gotta love it!
    Thanks for being the huge pillar of support you are for everyone in this community, myself included!

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    1. I am looking forward to the next installment of your story!

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  9. A great phrase. Funny to think it still goes on today!

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  10. Or like kids going after the candy when the pinata finally bursts!
    Life & Faith in Caneyhead
    I am Ensign B ~ One of Tremp's Troops with the
    A to Z Challenge

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  11. Black Friday can bring death, glad Canada isn't that nuts yet haha

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