Thursday, February 25, 2016

Buying Books - Reading List

I have been on my repairing lease for a month now, and it was the wisest thing I could have done.  No composing.  No wheel-spinning.  Catching my breath.  Catching up with people who mean a lot to me.  I will be phoning my oldest friend tonight and engaging in a long chat.  It has been too long since I have done that.My current project is a Beta-Read that is disgracefully overdue (dear Author: expect it Sunday) involving an author I love and a book that I want to review once it is published.

...and I have been catching up on books (remember reading them?  I'd forgotten).  I just ordered a copy of a book from the 1930's, J. B. Priestley's The Good Companions.  That should be arriving shortly.  A nice, fat hardback book to replace mine, which, having turned Australian, I believe, has 'gone walkabout'.
At loose ends, but pleasantly so, I started looking at books.
And then, I must confess, I went a little crazy and ordered four of them:



In downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Lou works tirelessly to build her beloved yet struggling French restaurant, Luella’s, into a success. She cheerfully balances her demanding business and even more demanding fiancé…until the morning she discovers him in the buff—with an intern.

Witty yet gruff British transplant Al is keeping himself employed and entertained by writing scathing reviews of local restaurants in the Milwaukee newspaper under a pseudonym. When an anonymous tip sends him to Luella’s, little does he know he’s arrived on the worst day of the chef’s life. The review practically writes itself: underdone fish, scorched sauce, distracted service—he unleashes his worst.

The day that Al’s mean-spirited review of Luella’s runs, the two cross paths in a pub: Lou drowning her sorrows, and Al celebrating his latest publication. As they chat, Al playfully challenges Lou to show him the best of Milwaukee and she’s game—but only if they never discuss work, which Al readily agrees to. As they explore the city’s local delicacies and their mutual attraction, Lou’s restaurant faces closure, while Al’s column gains popularity. It’s only a matter of time before the two fall in love…but when the truth comes out, can Lou overlook the past to chase her future?


This sounds delicious, with most of the elements I love in a story.  Naturally, I ordered it in paperback.  Beware when you are browsing, whether online or in a brick and mortar bookstore.  You find other things that look good.  Like this:


Http://bookgoodies.com/a/B00LEYI3PKLittle Beach Street Bakery
A quiet seaside resort. An abandoned shop. A small flat. This is what awaits Polly Waterford when she arrives at the Cornish coast, fleeing a ruined relationship.

To keep her mind off her troubles, Polly throws herself into her favorite hobby: making bread. But her relaxing weekend diversion quickly develops into a passion. As she pours her emotions into kneading and pounding the dough, each loaf becomes better than the last. Soon, Polly is working her magic with nuts and seeds, chocolate and sugar, and the local honey—courtesy of a handsome beekeeper. Packed with laughter and emotion, Little Beach Street Bakery is the story of how one woman discovered bright new life where she least expected—a heartwarming, mouthwatering modern-day Chocolat that has already become a massive international bestseller.

Well, I have never read Chocolat, but this sounds very interesting, touching, and amusing, as did this one:




A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over--and see everything anew.


Bakeries and bookstores are somehow connected in my thoughts.  I don't know whether it is because I view shelves overflowing with potentially fascinating, enjoyable, sob-worthy and laugh-inducing books as akin to a glass-front bakery counter that contains (at any given time): Italian pastries, French pastries, gorgeous loaves of golden-crusted handmade bread braided (like Challah), slashed (like baguettes), overflowing with butter (like croissants), filled with herbs or cheese or...  Well, you get the idea.  I have a terrible time leaving bakeries.


And true to form I saw this as I finished my order.



Heroic bookseller Laurent Letellier comes across an abandoned handbag on a Parisian street. There's nothing in the bag to indicate who it belongs to, although there's all sorts of other things in it. Laurent feels a strong impulse to find the owner and tries to puzzle together who she might be from the contents of the bag. Especially a red notebook with her jottings, which really makes him want to meet her. Without even a name to go on, and only a few of her possessions to help him, how is he to find one woman in a city of millions?

Ah, Paris...  What's not to like?  I added it to the list.  I'll consider it part of my Repairing Lease...  AFTER the beta-read!

...Which brings me to this lovely blog hop:Lexa Cain and her two wonderful co-hosts L.G. Keltner @ Writing Off The Edge and Tonja Drecker @ Kidbits.

Check them out and be prepared to smile!

12 comments:

  1. Wow, what a great to-be-read list! It's so important to take respite time, isn't it, Diana? I'm glad you're doing some "self care." Good on you!

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    1. You would think I would remember. What is the old music saying? "Music is sweeter after a rest." It has been very worthwhile (and I'm enjoying the Beta Read, especially. Thanks for coming by!

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  2. As someone who used to be an avid reader I certainly understand your post. While I'm writing I can't read as my head is already too full. In between each stage of writing, re writing, editing etc, I treat myself to a lovely wallow in novels I've stored up. The Safeguard is high on my reading list especially as my husband read it and kept quoting good bits to me. Enjoy your 'rest'. X

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    1. I think your practice is an excellent idea and one that I will be adopting, though not for so long a period as this one! So many cobwebs that needed to be cleared out! Your husband is very sweet.

      Incidentally, I finished Kritsa, which I will be reviewing. Just one quick remark: your handling of the battle was wonderful - catching the fast happenings - quick impressions - flashes of description...and the thoughts of the characters. Very, very good and touching...

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  3. As I started reading your book choices, and saw the first two dealt with food, it made me wonder if you were hungry when you went into that book store. Kinda like grocery shopping on an empty stomach. (Never good!)

    But, no, you were just hungry for some good books to read. I get that. I probably read entirely too much, but I'm gonna keep on doing it until my vision won't let me do it anymore. I'm not a huge fan of television, so while my hubby has that on in the evenings, I sit beside him with a book. Works for both of us.

    I have as little restraint when it comes to reading books as I do when faced with a decadent dessert. Okay, it doesn't even have to be decadent, to tell the truth. Something sweet. Even jello will do. :)

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    1. Well.... (*cough, cough*) The first one DID have that coconut cake, and I'm purely a sucker for (homemade) yellow cake with boiled frosting and coconut. And then I saw that cupcake with the garish blue frosting and I was hooked.

      *Sigh*

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  4. Diana, now I'm craving coconut cake!!! I love to read. And even while writing, I try to read at least a few pages before going to sleep. Thank you for mentioning these books. They sound amazing.

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    1. Hi, Cathrina -
      I can heartily recommend Coconut Cake. ...I did read the ending to the one about the red notebook, but I will behave myself. It's charming. Thanks for stopping by!

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  5. There are few things in life as exciting as a buying a bunch of new books!!! I hope you have a great chat with your friend, get the beta-read done, and enjoy your new books! :)

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    1. Thanks, Lexa! I really need to broaden my reading. I might even...(shivering)...dip my toe into horror...

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  6. All those books sound good. According to Steven King “If you don't have time to read, you don't have the time (or the tools) to write,” so enjoy the books and don't feel guilty. Hope you had a wonderful long chat with your friend.

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    1. Hi, Beth - Steven King is always on point, if not always diplomatic. Great quote! (The chat went very nicely.)

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